Reviews elsewhere on the web:
Future Cities

Sean Topham

Where's my Space Age

Now that it's getting on for 40 years since the first man on the moon, the era has a strange feeling of unreality. It augered so much for the future, which never happened. In 'Where's my Space Age?' Sean Topham looks back at the how the space program affected society at the time, and in particular how designers created a fitting end to the modernist era.

A principal part of the book is the pictures, both of the space program, and of the many aspects of design which were affected. Sometimes one feels that copyright problems have prevented a particular image from being shown, but there are plenty in the book so this doesn't matter too much. The copy I read had a bright pink cover, highlighting the sense of fun and novelty that the book is presenting.

But as well as the pictures, Topham provides an insightful commentary of some of the aspects of the era. We see the irony of the fact that although space travel appealed to children of the time, with plenty of toys reflecting the fact, the new designs for furniture and architecture were often aimed at the growing numbers of childless couples and singles in casual relationships. The author also looks at how attitudes have changed - how a white male military pilot would be seen as less of a role model today. All in all the book provides a fun reminder of a unique era in our history.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 160 pages  
ISBN: 3791328441
Salesrank: 2094234
Weight:1.59 lbs
Published: 2003 Prestel Publishing
Marketplace:New from $18.98:Used from $11.70
Buy from Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 160 pages  
ISBN: 3791328441
Salesrank: 456824
Weight:1.59 lbs
Published: 2003 Prestel
Marketplace:New from £46.58:Used from £22.92
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Paperback 160 pages  
ISBN: 3791328441
Salesrank: 1484109
Weight:1.59 lbs
Published: 2003 Prestel Pub
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 71.52:Used from CDN$ 32.54
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
The author of "Blowup" goes back to the future to follow the evolution of space-age design: from its optimistic conception in the 1950s to its decline in the 1970s and its retro-revival today. The Soviet-American race to the moon ignited a world-wide obsession with outer space and futuristic living that was manifested in the era's architecture, design and popular culture - and reflected in everything from furniture to postage stamps, fashion to children's toys. With hundreds of illustrations, Sean Topham reveals the countless ways the galactic frontier invaded every aspect of daily life: in household objects and "haute couture", advertising and comic books, plastics and interior design, private homes and public buildings. He explains how artists' conceptions of the future influenced history and were in turn shaped by events for decades to come. As Topham charts the rise and fall of futuristic design through the work of Eero Aarnio, Joe Colombo, Verner Panton, Pierre Cardin, Courreges, Paco Rabanne, Archigram, Haus-Rucker-Co, Matti Suuronen, John Lautner and Adrian Frutiger, among many others, he reveals how the era's euphoric energy gave way to a more anxious uncertainty. He also questions whether today's passion for futuristic design is purely retro-chic or the dawning of a new fascination with space-age culture.