Reviews elsewhere on the web:
The Reading Life

Alexander Pushkin

The Queen of Spades

The Queen of Spades and Other Stories is a translation into English of the main prose works of 19th Century Russsian writer Alexander Pushkin

Pushkin, considered by many to be the greatest Russian poet, seems less sure of himself when writing short stories - he invents a complicated rigmarole of the origin of the rather melodramatic Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin. The title story The Queen of Spades is longer and provides a twist on the age old question - how much do you trust your livelihood to an oracle (even if you think that it's infallible). The book also includes the novel-length The Captain's Daughter on the capture of the hero by a rebel (influenced by Scotts's Rob Roy). In this story 'love conquers all', and some might find Pushkin's writing rather over-sentimental, but if you like Jane Austen or Anthony Trollope then you'll get on fine with this. The final story of the book Peter the Great's Blackamoor is unfinished.

The work is smoothly translated by Alan Myers and the introduction and notes by Andrew Kahn provide plenty of information about the historical context of the works (even if he is over-fond of the word 'irony').

Amazon.com info
Paperback 336 pages  
ISBN: 0199538654
Salesrank: 125496
Weight:0.66 lbs
Published: 2009 Oxford University Press
Amazon price $10.81
Marketplace:New from $6.51:Used from $3.79
Buy from Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 336 pages  
ISBN: 0199538654
Salesrank: 240735
Weight:0.66 lbs
Published: 2009 OUP Oxford
Amazon price £8.99
Marketplace:New from £3.41:Used from £2.03
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Paperback 336 pages  
ISBN: 0199538654
Salesrank: 368700
Weight:0.66 lbs
Published: 2009 Oxford Paperbacks
Amazon price CDN$ 12.42
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 6.24:Used from CDN$ 5.48
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
This volume contains new translations of four of Pushkin's best works of fiction. The Queen of Spades has long been acknowledged as one of the world's greatest short stories, in which Pushkin explores the nature of obsession. The Tales of Belkin are witty parodies of sentimentalism, while Peter the Great's Blackamoor is an early experiment with recreating the past. The Captain's Daughter is a novel-length masterpiece which combines historical fiction in the manner of Sir Walter Scott with the devices of the Russian fairy-tale. The Introduction provides close readings of the stories and places them in their European literary context.

About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.