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guardian.co.uk

Julian Baggini

The Duck that Won the Lottery

As you go through life you'll find lots of people trying to persuade you of their point of view. So how do you decide whether to accept what they say? In The Duck That Won the Lottery: and 99 Other Bad Arguments Julian Baggini tells you ways of identifying dubious arguments.

If someone starts talking about quantum sheep or the medical benefits of colourpucture then you'll probably be on your guard. However, for many arguments you won't be forewarned of possible flaws. For instance, should the UK have entered the war in Iraq, given that opinion polls showed that the public was against it?

So will this book improve your critical thinking skills. Unfortunately, I rather doubt it. The trouble is that there are too many short pieces which don't have space to go into details. For instance, Baggini claims that studying the winning numbers in previous lotteries won't help you win - but doesn't notice that avoiding popular numbers might increase your potential winnings. Many of the pieces are criticising sound-bite arguments, but then don't give much more than a sound-bite in reply. So you might want to read this book for fun - it is amusing to see what fallacious arguments people will bring out - but I wouldn't recommend it as a way to help you decide what to believe.

Amazon.com info
Hardcover 224 pages  
ISBN: 184708043X
Salesrank: 1976644
Weight:0.93 lbs
Published: 2008 Granta Books
Marketplace:New from $12.00:Used from $1.25
Buy from Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk info
Hardcover 224 pages  
ISBN: 184708043X
Salesrank: 601088
Weight:0.93 lbs
Published: 2008 Granta Books
Marketplace:New from £12.99:Used from £0.01
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Hardcover 224 pages  
ISBN: 184708043X
Salesrank: 44221
Weight:0.93 lbs
Published: 2008 Granta Books
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 43.88:Used from CDN$ 0.25
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
This companion volume to "The Pig That Wants To Be Eaten" provides another rapid-fire selection of short, stimulating and entertaining capsules of philosophy. This time the focus is on the bad argumentative moves people use all the time, in politics, the media and everyday life. Each entry will be around 700 words and will take as its starting point an example of questionable reasoning from the media or literature. As with The Pig, the aim is to give readers something to chew on and work through for themselves.